The Tragedy of an Inappropriate Education

Education is the foundation of a productive and fulfilling life. Education teaches us to read, think, process, and analyze information. When taught these skills, individuals can grow and develop into contributing members of society. We can all agree that this is the goal of an appropriate education. But when is an education “appropriate,” and who Continue Reading »

Avoid “Feel Good” Goals

In examining hundreds of IEP goals, we have noticed that too many just describe hoped-for outcomes and not measurable results. These goals tend to be vague statements of what the IEP Team would like the student to be rather than define a path toward a specific accomplishment. We call these “feel good” goals because they Continue Reading »

Have a Business Relationship With Your Team, Not an Emotional One

You should always strive to treat IEP meetings as if they were business negotiations, not a friendly get together or a hostile confrontation. In an earlier article we wrote about the etiquette of dealing with your Team members. One caution we wrote about in particular, that parents should always maintain a courteous demeanor toward their Continue Reading »

After the Diagnosis, Then What?

Parents who realize their child is struggling, who suspect something is amiss, will seek out the advice of a pediatrician, a psychologist, or perhaps another professional. At first, parents don’t want to notice that their child isn’t perfect. They may suppress their feelings, but eventually, if their child is not achieving the usual milestones, some Continue Reading »

A New Kind of Book Club

We recently had an idea that we would like to share with parents whose children (or grandchildren) are in special education. Have you ever considered starting a book club to read and discuss books on special education? We recently read about a parent group that was reading Pete and Pam Wright’s excellent book, From Emotions Continue Reading »

Parents As Equal Participants in Team Meetings

There is a lot of misunderstanding about the role of parents at Team meetings. In our conversations with other parents and in too many online sources, there is frequently a misconception that IDEA gives parents an equal voice with school personnel in deciding what services or educational placement their child needs. The phrase that is Continue Reading »

Interview with Michael Brian Murphy, author of “NLD From the Inside Out”

We are pleased to let our readers know about a new book, NLD From the Inside Out, by author Michael Brian Murphy. We believe that this book, just published by Jessica Kingsley Publishers, will be an invaluable resource for teens and adults diagnosed with Nonverbal Learning Disability as well as their families, therapists, and teachers. Continue Reading »

Levels of Performance and Your Child’s IEP

An IEP is your child’s roadmap to an appropriate education. No map can help you, however, if you don’t know your starting point. That is why the IEP must contain objectively measured assessments of your child’s abilities before it can be an effective educational roadmap. There are two places where clear descriptions of your child’s Continue Reading »

Special Education Etiquette

Special education can be both rewarding for parents and a source of frustration when things don’t go the way they should. While some experts believe that conflict between parents and schools is normal and inevitable,1 it is too easy to become frustrated with the special education system and take it out on the individuals in Continue Reading »

Response to Intervention Falls Short

Last year we wrote about how RTI (Response to Intervention) was being used by some schools to delay, or even prevent, students from being evaluated for special education services (Gatekeeping 101: Response to Intervention). Now it appears that even when used as intended, RTI isn’t achieving the goals that educators promised. In this followup article, Continue Reading »